After being in beta for several years (since 2017), Nvidia is finally launching its cloud gaming service GeForce Now. Unlike the (dead on arrival) Google Stadia, GeForce Now doesn’t offer a console-like experience with its own exclusive lineup of games.

Nvidia’s GeForce Now connects with Steam, Epic Games Store, GoG, or Blizzard Battle.net accounts so players can play games that they have already purchased on those third-party digital platforms. These games can then be played on any PC, MacOS, or Android device if they have the app installed.

However, GeForce Now isn’t free, as it costs US$5 (or roughly RM20+) per month to access the Founders Edition, which allows players to receive up to six hours of gameplay at a time, ray tracing support, and priority access. There’s also a free account option available, though players will be limited to one-hour sessions at a time and subject to queues if the server is too busy.

As for now, GeForce Now won’t be available everywhere in the world, as players have to located somewhere near a data centre to reduce latency for playable games. There are currently nine data centres in the US, five in Europe, one in Korea and two in Japan. However, it’s not supported yet in other parts of the world and Asia, including Southeast Asian countries like Malaysia.

Nvidia recommends 50Mbps for the best possible experience, 30Mbps for 1080p60, and 15Mbps for 720p60. However, according to Gizmodo, those speeds don’t really guarantee good performance. It looks like all these cloud gaming services tend to suffer from the same problems.


 

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