We’ve listed out the best games and manga to read during Malaysia’s MCO period, but what about video game music you can stream? After all, music can help relieve boredom while also add colour to your routine.

It’s time to sort that out with our suggestions from us at Kakuchopurei. We’re keeping it a tad diverse, from orchestral craziness to all-out rockin’ fast BPM tunes to keep you pumped.

Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag

ACIV: Black Flag’s score is a great complement to one of the best AC campaigns til today. Carries a great pirate vibe without going over the top or overselling it. Does not try too hard to emulate Pirates of the Caribbean, but still relatable to casual fans of the pirate genre. -Kenn Leandre

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare (2019)

Sarah Schachner’s work on last year’s Call of Duty is melodramatic yet understated; calming yet furious and gets your heart pumping at the twist of a note.

Her work on the 2019 Modern Warfare may be her best yet; standout tracks include “Piccadilly Circus” and “The Wolf’s Den”. – Kenn Leandre

Command & Conquer: Red Alert 2

Guitar riffs, heavy metal, and Russian march anthems. What’s not to love? -Kenn Leandre

Halo: Combat Evolved

Arguably the mother of all FPS soundtracks. Encapsulating heroism, hope, grandeur and scale all wrapped in a tight package exemplifying our helmeted protagonist in Master Chief.

The church-like choir accompanying the orchestra is a perfect example that classical elements can meld seamlessly into a futuristic setting. The highlight of all this is none other than the Halo theme playing during the Warthog Run as Master Chief races to board the Pelican at the end of the first game. Truly an iconic moment in gaming. -Kenn Leandre

Apex Legends

Just like Halo, orchestral music and futuristic themes mix very well together in this battle royale game released in 2019. The soundtrack adds a sense of wonder of the unknown laced with heavy themes of swagger and confidence synonymous with participants of the Apex Games.

The high point of this short yet impactful soundtrack surely is the “You Are the Jumpmaster” theme which plays as players get ready for their impending doom, or victory in the arena. -Kenn Leandre

Persona 4

Shoji Meguro is a maestro musical composer who deserves just as much as recognition as Final Fantasy’s Nobuo Uematsu. Persona 4’s soundtrack is one that elicits all kinds of emotion. I loved walking around the quaint town of Inaba to the sweet “Your Affection”, “Signs Of Love” and “Heartbeat, Heartbreak”.

Meanwhile, the “Heaven” theme from one of the late-game dungeons was a jazzy and melancholy piece that spurred me on to rescue my protagonist’s niece, Nanako. However, the cherry on top is the ending song “Never More”, which made me heartbroken over having to end my journey but feeling this fuzzy warm feeling inside as well. -Comicslord

Persona 3

Shoji Meguro also worked on Persona 4’s predecessor, Persona 3. Unlike Persona 4’s emotional and uplifting music, Persona 3 is much more focused on hip hop and R&B tunes.

Walking around to the beat of Iwatodai Dorm never gets old, while the final boss theme “The Battle For Everyone’s Souls” is aptly named for its epicness. – Comicslord

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt

Marcin Przybyłowicz is another great composer, with an epic soundtrack for the masterpiece of a game, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, comparable to that of the music from Game Of Thrones or The Lord Of The Rings.

I still remember how “The Wolven Storm” took me by surprise when Geralt’s simple trip to a bar with his friend Zoltan became one of the most memorable parts of the game for me.

When you’re not feeling like your heart is torn asunder by “The Wolven Storm”, you can listen to any of the other epic songs from The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt. –Comicslord

NieR: Automata

It would be difficult to imagine NieR: Automata without its soundtrack. Composed by Keiichi Okabe, the tracks range from strange but atmospheric music that immerses you in its post-apocalyptic world of androids and machines, to magnificent pieces that somehow manage to be epic and sad at the same time.

Simply put, there’s nothing quite like it. – Melvyn Tan

Kindred Spirits on the Roof

If you need something relaxing and cheery, this yuri visual novel’s OST will do the trick. If you’ve played it, it’d be impossible not to remember the tracks “Shirojo”, “Sweet Words Sweet Hearts”, and “My Territory”; not just because they’re played often, but because they’re so darn memorable. Shirojo, in particular, is ridiculously catchy.

The rest of the soundtrack doesn’t stand out as much, but they’re still competently crafted tracks that make for nice background accompaniment. Which is appropriate, since they’re background music. – Melvyn Tan

Mirror’s Edge (2008 version)

There’s just something soothing and sublime about this 2008-made soundtrack from Swedish electronica wizard Solar Fields. From the inviting “Introduction” that’s basically the leitmotif of the entire game to the lowfi-to-escalated stage track mixes like “Ropeburn” and “Shard”, you’ll be hard-pressed not to include this gem of an album into your daily routine.  –Mr Toffee

Killer Instinct (2013 version)

Arguably one of the greatest fighting game soundtracks that will keep your blood pumping. Both Season 1 and Season 2’s music are perfect for your workout-from-home regiment, be it the dance-savvy nature of “Touch me and I’ll break your face” to the rocktastic “Inferno”. –Mr Toffee

If you have any suggestions, let us know here or on Facebook!

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